Afghanistan

Afghanistan is prone to many hydrometeorological hazards that have adversely affected the lives, properties, and livelihoods of its people. Wars and civil conflicts have not only exacerbated the vulnerability of the Afghan people but also hindered the implementation of initiatives aiming at reducing disaster risk.  

 

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Fragility/Conflict status: Conflict situation
Programme type: Country multi-year
Funding: $3.66 million
Duration: 2019-2025
Status: Ongoing

Key goals

  • Strengthened capacity of provider and user agencies for the development and delivery of weather, water, and climate-climate-related early warning services.
  • Production and communication of weather forecasts and impact-based warnings focusing on the end-users’ needs.
  • Delivery of services to stakeholders and end users and assisting them to access and utilize information for key sectors such as agriculture.
  • Enhanced decision-making to mitigate the adverse impacts of natural hazards on life, livelihoods, and property.

Progress to date

  • 3 hazards – floods, drought, and landslides – with stronger forecasting and warning ability.
  • 40 million people are covered by early warning systems or local preparedness through CREWS support.
  • 160 women benefitted from capacity development offered by CREWS.

Spotlight

Building resilience among remote communities

In a highly disaster-prone country ranked 180th on the Human Development Index, any CREWS project in Afghanistan needed components with direct and immediate impact on people and communities. The objective – build their resilience to natural hazards. In the past decade, nearly 70 disasters caused by floods, landslides, droughts, earthquakes, and storms affected more than 25 million people in the country. Before the political change in Afghanistan put a brake on CREWS activities, a community-based disaster risk management initiative was piloted in 10 communities comprising nearly 10,500 people at the time. Low-cost sustainable weather stations and weatherboards were installed; women and men were trained to use them. Impact surveys showed that 9 in 10 community members reported frequent use of weather data for decision-making. The result? Women, men, crops, and assets were better protected. With many Afghan communities in remote, hard-to-access locations in Afghanistan, expanding this approach, when possible, would see more resilient people and communities – including women.

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